Dale Rosenberg, MD

Colon Cancer Screening Saves Lives

Dr. Dale Rosenberg

Dr. Dale Rosenberg
MD: Jefferson Medical College
Internship: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, PA
Residency: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, PA
Clinical and Research Fellowship: University of Pennsylvania
Board Certification: Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Many people who develop colorectal cancer have no symptoms during the early stages of the disease, which is why it is often discovered when it is too late. Fortunately, a simple screening colonoscopy can catch colorectal cancer easily and often stop it in its tracks.

The main advantage of a colonoscopy is that we look for polyps, which can lead to cancer.

“The vast majority of polyps don’t cause any symptoms; they just grow silently,” says Dr. Dale Rosenberg, a board-certified internist, gastroenterologist, and medical director at Regional Gi.

“If someone is at average risk, the recommendation is that they start screening at age 50. If they have other colon cancer risk factors like a family history of polyps or colon cancer, they would start sooner, around age 40.”

Due to evidence that African-Americans develop colon cancer at a younger age, they should have their first screening around age 45.

Once a patient has had a colonoscopy, they do not need to have another one for a decade, unless polyps are detected or they experience a change in bowel habits.

Colonoscopies are quick and painless; the procedure generally takes 20-30 minutes. Rosenberg informs patients that the only side effect. they are likely to have when they get home is a bit of mild gas.

“In Lancaster County, the vast majority of colonoscopies are administered with Propofol anesthesia, and the patient is sleeping deeply and generally doesn’t feel anything.”

Rosenberg says less than 60 percent of people who should be screened in Lancaster County are screened regularly, but he hopes more people will be willing to schedule the procedure after learning how simple and essential it is.

Medicare and most insurance companies will cover colonoscopies, which are offered at all area hospitals and three Regional Gi ambulatory surgery centers, located at 2104 Harrisburg Pike, Suite 300, Lancaster; 2112 Harrisburg Pike, Suite 323, Lancaster; and 4140 Oregon Pike, Ephrata.

Rosenberg and the other specialists at Regional Gi would like you to consider that “20-30 minutes of screening could mean many more years of health and happiness.”

For more information regarding colon cancer screening, contact your primary care physician or call Regional Gi at (717) 869-4600, or go online at www.regionalgi.com.

7 Things to Know About Getting a Colonoscopy

Prevention and early detection of colon cancer through colon cancer screening is an important factor of your overall health. The American Cancer Society recommends colon cancer testing (there are several acceptable methods) for everyone starting at age 50, though some people with certain risk factors may need to start at a younger age. Colonoscopy is one of the most widely used tests because not only can it find colon cancers, it can also find polyps that can be removed before they turn into cancer. Knowing what to expect can take away some of the fear and anxiety of a colonoscopy and the preparation required for it, often called bowel prep. Here are 7 things The American Cancer Society thinks you should know before you go:

What is a colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy is an exam that lets a doctor closely look at the inside of the entire colon and rectum to find polyps or signs of cancer. Polyps are small growths that over time can become cancer. The doctor uses a flexible, hollow, lighted tube about the thickness of a finger that has a tiny video camera on the end. This tube, called a colonoscope, is gently eased inside the colon and sends pictures to a TV screen. Special instruments can be passed through the colonoscope to remove small polyps or take tissue samples if needed.

What is bowel prep?

Bowel prep is a process to clean out the colon as much as possible so the doctor can see the inside clearly and get good pictures. The prep may include eating a special diet, drinking up to a gallon of a liquid laxative, medicines, and sometimes enemas that make you go to the bathroom a lot. You may also be instructed to stop taking certain over-the-counter or prescription medications as long as a week before the test.

Where are colonoscopies done?

Colonoscopies may be done in a doctor’s office, a hospital, a clinic, or a surgery center. The tests are typically done is a private room.

What to Expect

The colonoscopy itself takes about 30 minutes. Patients are usually given medicine to help them relax and sleep while it’s done. If so, you will not be allowed to drive afterward, so someone you know must come with you and drive you home. You’ll also have to plan to stay home the day of the test until the drugs wear off.

Does it hurt?

Most people don’t feel pain during any of the tests, but may feeling cramping or discomfort afterward because of the air that was puffed into the colon during the test, to keep it open for hte doctor to examine.

What if they find something?

If a small polyp is found during a colonoscopy, your doctor will probably remove it during the test. If a polyp is too large to be removed, or if you have an abnormality that looks like cancer, the doctor will take a small piece of it out to check it for cancer or pre-cancer cells (a biopsy). The results of this tissue analysis will determine whether you need additional procedures or treatment.

How often is a colonoscopy needed?

If nothing is found, you can go up to 10 years without another one. If something is found, you may need more frequent tests or treatment.

© All rights reserved to American Cancer Society, Inc.

 

Men’s Health Month – Have You Scheduled Your Colonoscopy?

Colon Screening Saves Lives, Dear Dad:

National Men’s Health Month is celebrated during June. During the month, families and communities work together to promote healthy living among men and boys.

Did you know that colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men and women combined in the United States? According to the American Cancer Society, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is about 1 in 21 (4.7%) for men.

Colon cancer is a malignant growth that arises from the lining of the colon or rectum. Benign polyp growth may be indicative of colon cancer. Colon cancer can occur sporadically. However, colon cancer can also occur heretically through genetic abnormalities transmitted from a parent. Incidence rates increase with advancing age.

Colon Cancer Screening Saves Lives
A colonoscopy procedure is quick and painless! During a colonoscopy, tissue samples can be detected and any abnormal growths can be removed. Before the test, a simple bowel prep will be administered. “20-30 minutes of screening could mean many more years of health and happiness,” says Regional Gi’s Dr. Dale Rosenberg.

Interested in Learning More?
For more information regarding colon cancer — symptoms, testing, treatment — please visit Regional Gi online. Our specialists will see you — and treat you — as an individual. Make your health a top priority and schedule your colonoscopy screening today!

Dale Rosenberg, MD

Colon Cancer Screening Saves Lives by Dr. Dale Rosenberg

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Many people who develop colorectal cancer have no symptoms during the early stages of the disease, which is why it is often discovered when it is too late. Fortunately, a simple screening colonoscopy can catch colorectal cancer easily and often stop it in its tracks.

The main advantage of colonoscopy is that we look for polyps, which can lead to cancer. “The vast majority of polyps don’t cause any symptoms, they just grow silently,” says Dr. Dale Rosenberg, a board certified internist, gastroenterologist and Medical Director at Regional Gi. “If someone is at average risk, the recommendation is that they start screening at age 50. If they have other colon cancer risk factors like a family history of polyps or colon cancer, they would start sooner, around age 40.” Due to evidence that AfricanAmericans develop colon cancer at a younger age, they should have their first screening around age 45. Once a patient has had a colonoscopy, they do not need to have another one for a decade, unless polyps are detected or they experience a change in bowel habits.

Colonoscopies are quick and painless; the procedure generally takes 20–30 minutes. Dr. Rosenberg assures patients that the only side effect they are likely to have when they get home is a bit of mild gas. “In Lancaster County, the vast majority of colonoscopies are administered with Propofol anesthesia and the patient is sleeping deeply and generally doesn’t feel anything.”

Dr. Rosenberg says less then 60 percent of people who should be screened in Lancaster County are screened regularly, but hopefully more people will be willing to schedule the procedure after learning how simple and essential it is. Medicare and most insurance companies will cover colonoscopies, which are offered at all area hospitals and two Regional Gi ambulatory surgery centers, one at the Lancaster General Health Campus, and the other at Regional Gi’s Brownstown endoscopy center.

Dr. Rosenberg and the other specialists at Regional Gi want to begin your New Year with this thought in mind, “20–30 minutes of screening could mean many more years of health and happiness.”

For more information regarding colon cancer screening, contact your primary care physician or call Regional Gi at (717) 869-4600, or go online at www.regionalgi.com.


 

Dr. Dale Rosenberg

Dr. Dale Rosenberg is a board certified internist, gastroenterologist, and Medical Director at Regional Gi.

MD: Jefferson Medical College
Internship: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, PA
Residency: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, PA
Clinical and Research Fellowship: University of Pennsylvania
Board Certification: Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology

To schedule your visit, please contact us today.

 

Colon Cancer Screening Saves Lives by Dr. Dale Rosenberg

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Many people who develop colorectal cancer have no symptoms during the early stages of the disease, which is why it is often discovered when it’s too late. Fortunately, a simple screening colonoscopy can catch colorectal cancer easily and often stop it in its tracks.

The main advantage of colonoscopy is that we look for polyps, which can lead to cancer. “The vast majority of polyps don’t cause any symptoms, they just grow silently,” says Dr. Dale Rosenberg, a board certified internist, gastroenterologist and Medical Director at Regional Gi. “If someone is at average risk, the recommendation is that they start screening at age 50. If they have other colon cancer risk factors like family history of polyps or colon cancer, they would start sooner, around age 40.” Due to evidence that African Americans develop colon cancer at a younger age, they should have their first screening around age 45. Once a patient has had a colonoscopy, they do not need to have another one for a decade, unless polyps are detected or they experience a change in bowel habits.

Colonoscopies are quick and painless; the procedure generally takes 20-30 minutes. Dr. Rosenberg says less than 60 percent of people who should be screening in Lancaster County are screening regularly, but hopefully more people will be willing to schedule the procedure after learning how simple and essential it is. Medicare and most insurance companies will cover ambulatory surgery centers, one at the Lancaster General Health Campus, and the other at Regional Gi’s Brownstown endoscopy center.

For more information regarding colon cancer screening, contact your primary care physician or call Regional Gi at (717) 869-4600, or go online at www.regionalgi.com.

Colonoscopy Overview

As we prepare for the end of the year, it is important to schedule your colonoscopy screenings. These lifesaving and preventive procedures can detect colon cancer before it happens!

Colon cancer is a malignant growth that arises from the lining of the colon or rectum. Benign polyp growth may be indicative of colon cancer. Colon cancer can occur sporadically. However, colon cancer can also occur heretically through genetic abnormalities transmitted from a parent. Incidence rates increase with advancing age. It is never too early to get screened, however, colon cancer is most commonly seen in people over age 50.

A colonoscopy is an examination of the large intestine, also known as the colon. In patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, a colonoscopy can be used to identify and treat the source of the bleeding. Prior to the procedure, the patient ingests a potent laxative preparation to evacuate all stool from the colon.

After proper sedation, a long, flexible instrument is inserted into the rectum and carefully advanced to the cecum. As the instrument is withdrawn, the lining of the colon is carefully inspected by the physician.

For more information or to speak with our board certified gastrointestinal specialists, please contact us today. We look forward to serving you!

The Importance of Colonoscopy Screenings After 50

As we prepare for the end of the year, it is important to schedule your colonoscopy screenings. These lifesaving and preventive procedures can detect colon cancer before it happens!

Colon cancer is a malignant growth that arises from the lining of the colon or rectum. Benign polyp growth may be indicative of colon cancer. Colon cancer can occur sporadically. However, colon cancer can also occur heretically through genetic abnormalities transmitted from a parent. Incidence rates increase with advancing age. It is never too early to get screened, however colon cancer is most commonly seen in people over the age of 50.

For more information regarding colon cancer — symptoms, testing, treatment — please consult Regional Gi’s Condition Resource Page. Regional Gi’s board-certified gastrointestinal specialists will see you — and treat you — as an individual. We care about your health. Make your health a top priority and schedule a colonoscopy screening today!

To schedule your colonoscopy screening, please visit us online at www.regionalgi.com or call (717) 869-4600.

Two RGAL Nurses and a gastroenterologist

A Screening or Diagnostic Colonoscopy? What is the Difference?

As we approach the end of the year, it is important to schedule a colonoscopy screening. Regional Gi receives many questions regarding the difference between a screening and diagnostic colonoscopy procedure.

It is important to understand the difference between a screening and diagnostic colonoscopy screening. It is very important that you talk to your insurance company on your benefits and their criteria, as this can have an effect on your out-of-pocket costs such as deductibles or coinsurance. Most insurance plan will cover screening colonoscopies, while diagnostic will be applied to your deductible or coinsurance.

Screening Colonoscopy Factors

  • No symptoms before the procedure
  • No finding during the procedure (polyps, diverticulosis, etc.)
  • No personal family history or polyps
  • No family history of cancer or polyps (some insurances consider this high risk)

Diagnostic Colonoscopy Factors

  • Symptoms before the procedure such as change in bowel habits, rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, etc.
  • Findings during the procedure (polyps, cancer, diverticulosis, etc.)
  • Personal history of cancer or polyps
  • Family history of cancer or polyps (some insurances consider this high risk)

Important Note: Regional Gi follows appropriate coding guidelines and procedures. A screening procedure many become diagnostic based on findings during colonoscopy or symptoms you are experiencing.

The points noted above are to be used for informal purposes only, as insurance and benefits criteria vary by plan.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your insurance company to verify your benefits and out-of-pocket costs for your screening or diagnostic colonoscopy.

Feel free to share the attached PDF.

Colonoscopies Save Lives!

On September 19th, The New England Journal of Medicine published a study that provides further documentation that colonoscopy saves lives and some of the clearest evidence to date that colonoscopy has advantages over sigmoidoscopy for the prevention of colorectal cancer.

“Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States among men and women.  However, colon cancer is often highly treatable. If it’s found and treated early, while it’s small and before it has spread, the 5-year survival rate is about 90%. But because many people are not getting tested, only about 4 out of 10 are diagnosed at this early stage when treatment is most likely to be successful.” – Cancer.org

 The screening options compared in the study include sigmoidoscopy, a procedure that examines the lower portion of the large intestine, and colonoscopy, a procedure that examines the entire colon. Although the preparation for a sigmoidoscopy is easier than that of a colonoscopy, the benefits of having a full colonoscopy performed by a GI specialist offer a clear advantage in terms of possible prevention and treatment.

As is the case with many serious health conditions, prevention, early detection and treatment are vital to reducing the incidence of colon cancer and increasing survival rates for those individuals diagnosed with the disease.

A colonoscopy enables your specialist to view the entire colon, not just the lower portion.

This increases the likelihood that if something is wrong it will be detected. Also, during the procedure the physician can remove precancerous polyps or biopsy any suspicious lesions to make an accurate diagnosis.

At Regional Gi our experienced gastroenterologists provide the highest level of care and perform colonoscopies using CO2, which has been shown to reduce discomfort due to retained gas after the procedure.

If you are interested in learning more, read the American Gastroenterology Association full study here.

 If you are interested in scheduling a colonoscopy, you can use our online scheduling form by clicking here, or by calling (717) 869-4600

Daniel Connell, Jr. MD

Research Confirms Use of CO2 Reduces Pain

Research Confirms CO2 Reduces Pain for Colonoscopy PatientsThe use of CO2 has been proven to reduce discomfort and bloating after a colonoscopy, as well as, decrease recovery time and improve patient satisfaction.

Regional Gi is the only gastroenterology practice in Lancaster that uses CO2 in its procedure centers. CO2 is a safe and recommended alternative to using room air for a colonoscopy.

With less discomfort ,and no additional cost to you, wouldn’t you prefer CO2? Ask your family physician or contact Regional Gi at 717 869-4600 to learn more.

Back in May we set down with Dr. Connell to discuss the use of CO2 and its benefits in more detail. See that post and video below. [break]

Use of CO2: It is all about your comfort – May 9th 2013

Regional Gi is pleased to announce that we have implemented the use of CO2 during colonoscopy procedures performed at both of our facilities. Regional Gi is the only Lancaster GI practice that uses CO2 in their procedure centers (located at 2104 Harrisburg Pike and 4140 Oregon Pike).

The use of CO2, instead of room air, during colonoscopy procedures is proven to reduce bloating, abdominal pain, and flatus post procedure (as evidenced in many national and international studies).

CO2 may also reduce the patients time in the recovery area and lead to an earlier discharge after procedure. Patient comfort and satisfaction is enhanced by the use of CO2. If it is time to schedule your colonoscopy, consider Regional Gi . We recognize that your comfort is an important component of your care. Our use of CO2 demonstrates our commitment to you.